Curriculum Updates

Medicine is dynamic. Not only that, but wilderness medicine is even more so; especially since it’s so new, things are constantly changing. We stay abreast of changes in practices, techniques, and general knowledge, and therefore regularly update our curriculum to meet the current nationally accepted standards and guidelines. Check back often for updates made to our various curricula.

Venomous Snakebite Treatment

Aside from the coral snake, most of the venomous snakes in North America are pit vipers (rattlesnakes, copperheads, water moccasins, etc.). The good news is that most of these use a common

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Narcan Administration

As of recent, the epidemic of opioid overdoses should be familiar to most people. Reports of incidents in wilderness are rare, not entirely zero. Narcan, like the AED, is a valuable skill

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Treatment for Drowning

Drowning is a hypoxic brain issue (requiring supplemental oxygenation administration on scene). The focus on treatment is to reverse hypoxia with A-B-C CPR (not C-A-B). Use rescue breathing and if available, supplemental

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Thrombolytics in Frostbite Treatment

Thrombolytics (clot-dissolving medications) have a role in the treatment of severe frostbite in restoring circulation after the injury has been thawed. This hospital based treatment is time sensitive, and the sooner the

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Albuterol for HAPE

We no longer suggest the use of albuterol in the treatment of High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE). Although there are reports of beta-agonist use in HAPE treatment and the risks of use

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Cooling for Heat Stroke

Cold water immersion is the gold standard treatment for heat stroke. How much should we worry about inducing hypothermia when we cool heat stroke patients with cold water immersion?   This is

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Use of Rigid C-Collars

The Journal of Wilderness and Environmental Medicine (WEMJ 2019; 30(4): 412e6) has a study on improvised cervical collars that was conducted by a group at the University of Utah. They used a

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Syncope (Fainting)

Syncope (fainting) is a brief loss of postural tone followed by a spontaneous and complete recovery. It is often caused by a decreased blood flow to the brain, usually from low blood

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OTC Pain Medication

The combination of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medication such as Ibuprofen (eg. Advil), when taken together with Acetaminophen (eg. Tylenol), has been demonstrated in a number of studies to provide superior pain

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Epinephrine Administration for Anaphylaxis

OVERVIEW OF ANAPHYLAXIS Anaphylaxis is an allergic reaction that has life-endangering effects on the circulatory and respiratory systems. Anaphylaxis is an almost immediate, rapidly progressive multi-system allergic reaction to a foreign protein

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Compartment Syndrome

Compartment syndrome is a serious condition that involves increased pressure in a muscle compartment and can lead to muscle and nerve damage and problems with blood flow. It can be caused by

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Frostbite Treatment

The Wilderness Medical Society released a position paper on frostbite (Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, 22, 156–166. 2011). One of the points they made refers to the decision of “to thaw or not

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Don’t Bandage Both Eyes

In the case of imbedded objects or penetrating eye injury, the common advice has always been to bandage both the injured AND the uninjured eye. The rationale was conjugate gaze; if one

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Dental Emergencies

We no longer advise people to apply a small piece of crushed Aspirin to “cauterize” an exposed pulp and dull the nerve pain. This is incredibly painful and likely not to work,

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